Happy to Color Outside the Lines!

Posts tagged ‘local eating’

Orange and Cream Smoothies

Everytime my kids see that oranges are available for order in our CSA list, they immediately ask for homemade orange and cream smoothies.

orange

 

There are kind of like those orange smoothies you can get in the mall, but made with real food ingredients.

They are also very simple to make, which I always appreciate.

Start with 1.5 cups of cream. Yes, cream. It’s full fat, yes. Not scary, especially if you are using raw cream.

Blend  with 4 pasture raised egg yolks (super important that they are NOT store bought!) until the cream begins to thicken, about 30 seconds to a minute.

Next, add a couple handfuls of ice and a dash of vanilla,  1/4 cup real maple syrup and one cup of milk (another raw if possible moment) and blend until creamy, about 1-2 minutes.

Combine this mixture with equal parts of freshly juiced oranges (4-5 oranges) and serve over ice. Serves at least six. 🙂

This week my CSA has 10 pounds of naval oranges that are “a little on the ugly side” for $8.00.  Perfect for juicing…or blending with full fat locally raised raw dairy products until you have created a blissful beverage.

Either way. 😉

 

Rad(ishes)

My grandmother loved radishes. She didn’t call them “radishes”, though. She called them “RADeeshes.”

She would slice the greens off, scrub them up, put them in a tupperware bowl filled with water and stick them in the fridge for future snacking. I didn’t understand why she did that (it is done to help them keep their crunch) but I always thought they looked really pretty floating around the container. Radishes were beautiful, I thought. Too bad they tasted like dirt.

Fast forward 20 or so years, which is how long it took me to try radishes again. The only reason I tried them? I grew them. The only reason I grew them? Because I heard they were easy to grow and dang it, nothing else was coming up. I discovered that I was not only able to grow radishes, but I was able to grow them REALLY WELL. I had TONS of them. Red radishes, french breakfast, daikon…I had them all. The rabbits I was raising at the time were thrilled. I wasn’t sure I liked radishes THAT much.  The point of all this? They taste better when they aren’t from your grocery store. They don’t taste like dirt. They taste a bit spicy and sometimes a bit sweet and sort of …earthy? How is that for a terrible description? It also depends on your variety, so, yeah…go taste some for yourself. Do not rely on my poor use of adjectives and (sort of) descriptive phrases.

I ordered English Breakfast radishes last week in my CSA box. I’m no longer growing radishes and hadn’t had one in a while. I received this darling bundle:

radishes1

They have been eaten raw, juiced, sliced on salads, served with tacos, and admired for their beauty.

Especially when they are floating in water.

This week I am ordering red radishes AND daikon and will be trying my hand and roasting them into “radish chips”. If it is a successful venture, I will post the recipe. 🙂

While we wait for the results on that, take a look at reasons to eat radishes. There are many:

Health-Benefits-of-Radishes (1)

 

Don’t be afraid to revisit the foods that you thought you hated. It may taste surprisingly good to you now. All the more reason to check out your local Farmer’s Market…where food tastes like its supposed to. 😉

 

Grain Free Prosciutto and Arugula Pizza

Although I do not always stick to a grain free diet,  I try. I shoot for 60-70% success and call it good. I have found that there are some things that  I just can’t give up, and have to have on rare occasion:  My mom’s chicken dijon over rice. The occasional bowl of freshly popped popcorn. Red Vines.

One thing that was also on my list for a while? Pizza. It has been so great since I discovered I could make a pretty decent cracker-type crust without any grains! The possibilities are endless, but the other day I made my fave pizza ever. Mozzarella, Prosciutto and Arugula pizza. YUM. For added flair, I added some lemon balm leaves that were calling to me from my CSA box. SO yum. Here’s how I did it.

For the crust, you will need:

1/2 cup tapioca flour/starch

1/2 cup arrowroot

1/3 cup raw shredded parm cheese (I love TJ’s)

4 TBSP of refined coconut oil or other high-heat oil such as high-oleic sunflower

1 TBSP water

1 organic egg

Combine all ingredients. It will be sticky and kind of gummy.

Prepare 2 pieces of parchment paper the same size as your pizza pan ( you can trim the edges later)

BRUSH BOTH PIECES OF PARCHMENT WITH OLIVE OIL. IF YOU DO NOT DO THIS, YOU WILL END UP WITH A STICKY MESS.

Scrape the batter/ dough onto the first piece of parchment (on the greased side.) Now lay the other piece, greased side down, onto the dough. With a rolling pin, roll the crust out into a circle.

Peel the top piece of parchment off and discard. Put the crust, parchment and all, onto your pizza pan.

Next up, TOPPINGS. This is where you can do whatever you want. One suggestion? Don’t use anything too wet, like fresh mozz. It will make your dough gummy. I also find that while a good thick tomato based sauce works, a dense pesto does better. This recipe only calls for olive oil drizzled over it first, but a thick fig butter or would have been amazing.

For this recipe:

Drizzle the dough with olive oil, and brush to spread evenly.

Top with slices of mozz cheese (NOT the fresh one…too much water)

Top with prosciutto slices and bits of lemon balm (and then take a poorly lit crappy cell phone pic of it):

pizza1

 

Pop it in the oven. Bake at 400* for about 15-20 minutes. You want the crust nice and golden.

Once it comes out, top with the fresh arugula. I mixed mine with a bit of mesculin greens and some more lemon balm. 🙂 Some peeled, sliced fresh pears would have been awesome too, but I thought about it after the fact.

pizza2

 

Crispy, spicy, flavorful and satisfying. I think, for me,  “satisfying” is the most important aspect here, as sometimes, my meals are anything but.  I also feel a certain sense of satisfaction when I am using foods in the height of their freshness…bought locally, purchased in season, and used shortly after buying them.  I guarantee the fresh arugula I brought home, fresh out of the ground, is a million times tastier than the one at the store in July. You just can’t beat in-season, organic, local produce. That said, bagged arugula is better than *no* arugula. Work with what you’ve got around you, just make sure you’re eatin’ the good stuff.

Your beautiful self is worth it.

 

 

Mint Obsession

Mint is an amazing herb. I picked up my CSA box yesterday and within 2 minutes, the entire car smelled like a minty wonderland. I LOVE the stuff. I’m totally hung up on all forms of mint right now.  I think it’s because it makes me feel cooler. It’s freakin’ hot here ya’ll. I hate summer.

I use peppermint essential oil in my Rainbow “Rainmate” to help with headaches and fatigue. I use my Dr. Bronner’s peppermint soap every day (which is pure bliss, btw), and I suck down mint tea like nobody’s business.  No sweeteners, no additives, no foreign, strange ingredients. Just mint, tea, and water…pretty awesome stuff.

Mint is good for so many things. Here’s the breakdown from http://www.medicinalplants-pharmacognosy.com:

Amazing stuff!

Amazing stuff!

This stuff is also killer for headaches. A little peppermint oil on the temples and the relief is almost immediate. It’s like magic.

I had three bundles of mint in my box yesterday. It doesn’t keep especially long so I had to get to work puttin’ it to use. I LOVE me some mint iced tea in the summer so I thought I would share with you my system for having it on hand whenever the need for more mint arises.  Doing it this way not only saves me time in the long run, but allows me to use up the mint while it is still potent and flavorful.  If I was to do several small batches, it would dry up before I was able to use it all in its fresh minty glory. Dried mint works too, but I happen to prefer it as green and tender as possible 🙂

Here’s the scoop:

Wash your mint. Pick off any darkened or otherwise undesirable leaves. Add to a large pot and fill about 3/4 of the way with water:

The smell is only rivaled by fresh basil.

The smell is only rivaled by fresh basil.

Next, prepare whatever you will be freezing your mint tea “concentrate” in. I use mason jars. Yeah, I know..you’re not supposed to be able to freeze in glass. This is not entirely true, you just have to use common sense. Liquid expands as it freezes, therefore, you must leave ample space for the expansion *and* use only WIDE MOUTH mason jars. If you use narrow necked ones, it will most certainly break in the freezer. Truth be told, I break several mason jars every time I freeze in bulk, mostly because I over-fill them. If you don’t want to risk this, the Ball company makes some great freezer containers. I have also used quart sized yogurt containers or re-purposed kefir bottles. I like the kefir bottles because I know my dairy uses BPA free plastic. If you are using plastic containers, please do not fill your containers until the tea cools. Heat and plastic are never a good combination. Not only because of its tendency to melt, but because of the nasty chemicals it can release when heated.

While you are preparing your containers, your tea is brewing. It should turn a light shade of green:

Almost there...

Almost there. Also, I wore turquoise yesterday.

Allow the tea to stay at a low boil for about 10-15 minutes. Strain out the leaves, and prepare to fill your containers. I always use a canning funnel to cut back on the mess.

Careful, it's hot!

Careful, it’s hot!

Do not fill it too high if you are using mason jars.

leave at least 2 inches of  headspace.

leave at least 2 inches of head space.

Allow your tea to cool completely before freezing. If you are using glass, you may want to freeze with lids OFF initially, so see if there is enough space after expansion occurs. This would have saved me two jars yesterday. Use common sense, remember? 😛

This pot of mint tea yielded 8 pints of tea “concentrate” as well as enough leftover for a gallon of iced black mint tea.
minttea5

After I filled my eight jars, I took the leftover quart (or so) of mint tea (while it was still blazing hot) and divided it evenly between two half gallon mason jars. The tea was still plenty hot to steep my black tea bags. I added four organic black tea bags to each jar and walked away for about 20 minutes.

My fave tea. $3.00 and change at Whole Foods. :)

My fave tea. $3.00 and change at Whole Foods. 🙂

Once 20 minutes had elapsed, I filled the jars with water, fished out the bags (which are awesome for my compost heap), covered, and stuck in the refrigerator. Here is a fun tip: The green lid of your parm cheese can fits the top of a narrow necked mason jar perfectly. Makes a great pouring spout:

mintteajug

One pint of “concentrate” w/four black tea bags will make one half gallon of perfectly minty iced tea. When you are ready to use it, just pull the frozen concentrate out, let it thaw for a bit, steep your black tea bags in hot water for about 20 minutes, add the mint tea, and fill to make 1/2 a gallon. Serve with sprigs of mint, lemon slices or just plain ol’ ice.

Enjoy, be refreshed, and nourish your body all at the same time 🙂

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